PhD Education, higher Education Leadership

The PhD in education – higher education leadership degree program is a prestigious and highly effective degree program designed keeping in view the diverse requirements of schools, colleges and universities across the globe. This program is offered to individuals who have varied professional backgrounds and who have demonstrated significant prominent changes at their previous work places through their work and social responsibility. This program relies heavily on research, theory and professional practice in either student affairs or higher education.

After completing this degree program students will be able to take up leadership positions in higher education administration and universities. Policy making, skill development, mentoring and tutoring are few majors that are taught in this degree program.

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

Through, PhD. the graduates will learn to:

  • Critically analyze the specific challenges that will be faced by next generation education leaders and also how to address those challenges.
  • Conduct research that positively impacts social change.
  • Communicate to multiple audiences via effective oral and written formats.
  • Advocate for social change that integrates diverse perspectives and demonstrates awareness of global interrelationships.
General studies
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Information Research Strategies 2 Introduction to information research including electronic resources. This course is designed to help researchers locate, evaluate, and use information. It includes exploration of the research process, search strategies, locating resources, source documentation, and organization of research.
General studies
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Statistical Modeling and Analysis for Complex Data Problems 2 reviews some of today’s more complex problems, and reflects some of the important research directions in the field. Twenty-nine authors – largely from Montreal’s GERAD Multi-University Research Center and who work in areas of theoretical statistics, applied statistics, probability theory, and shastic processes – present survey chapters on various theoretical and applied problems of importance and interest to researchers and students across a number of academic domains.
Optimal Experimental Design 2 Introduces the philosophy of experimental design, provides an easy process for constructing experimental designs, calculating necessary sample size using R programs and teaches by example using a custom made R program package: OPDOE introduces experimenters to the philosophy of experimentation, experimental design, and data collection. It gives researchers and statisticians guidance in the construction of optimum experimental designs using R programs, including sample size calculations, hypothesis testing, and confidence estimation. A final chapter of in-depth theoretical details is included for interested mathematical statisticians.
Mathematical Modeling 2 complete range of basic modeling techniques: it provides a consistent transition from simple algebraic analysis methods to simulation methods used for research. Such an overview of the spectrum of modeling techniques is very helpful for the understanding of how a research problem considered can be appropriately addressed.
Research Methods and Design 2 Learners gain a thorough understanding of statistical tests appropriate to their dissertation topic and design, how to interpret the results of the tests and how to conduct follow-up analyses, as appropriate. This course includes guidelines and "best practices" for collecting data. Power analysis, what it is, why do it, and how to use available software is covered. Data preparation, use of software to analyze data, and understanding the calculated results are covered. Experience with computer-based statistical analysis techniques is stressed. Emphasizes what is applicable to the Learner’s proposed research questions, design, construct/variable definitions and properties of measurements. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Dissertation Planning, Writing, and Defending 2 step-by-step through the dissertation process, with checklists, illustrations, sample forms, and updated coverage of ethics, technology, and the literature review.
General studies
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School Leadership and Administration 2 ISLLC Standard, Leadership, Decision Making, Authority, Power, and Influence, Communication, Conflict Management, Organizational Culture, School Improvement, Introduction to Clinical Materials and Learning Experiences, Beginning Challenges, Student Problems, Administrator-Staff Relationships, School-Community Relations, Role and Organizational Problems, Social Justice Issues and Problems of Change
School Finance 2 This course will provide students with an understanding of and practical experience with the major concepts and tools in school finance. The course will cover the three distinct components of education finance: 1) evaluating revenue sources, including school aid; 2) developing and defending budgets; and 3) managing the finances and business operations of a school district. The objective is to provide students with an understanding of the general principles of education finance that can be applied in any setting.
School Safety 2 This course is designed to provide learners with set of standards that educators can use to evaluate their schools and then develop practical and systematic plans for ensuring orderly and caring learning environments. The course also addresses several theoretical perspectives through which learners can come to understand school safety. Attention is given to the distinction between preventing violence and promoting safety.
Leadership: Theory and Practice 2 Being a Leader, Recognizing Your Traits, Recognizing Your Philosophy and Style of Leadership, Attending to Tasks and Relationships, Developing Leadership Skills, Creating a Vision, Setting the Tone, Listening to Out-Group Members, Overcoming Obstacles and Addressing Ethics in Leadership.
Organizational Development 2 Survey of methodological approaches to planned change, including organizational diagnosis, data collection, interventions, feedback, and evaluation. Specific types of interventions covered include strategic planning, organizational design, culture change, team building, survey feedback, goal setting, and career development.
General studies
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Adult Education 3 Covers Exploring the world of learning theory; Theories of learning; A theory of adult learning, Theories of teaching, process model for learning; Advancements in Adult Learning; Adult learning within human resource development; New perspectives on The future and Practice in Adult Learning;
Higher Education Policy 3 Analyzes how issues of affordability, access, and accountability influence the way in which state governments approach, monitor, and set public higher education policy. The contributors examine the latest research on pressing challenges, explore how states are coping with these challenges, and consider what the future holds for public postsecondary education in the United States.
Academic Transformation 3 Balances cognitive theory and research with realistic and proven skills that students can deftly apply, utilizing a narrative tone, eye-catching design, and plentiful real-life examples, this course bestows students with life lessons covering the subjects of motivation, procrastination, time management, stress management, and behavior redirection — all while giving a solid understanding of why certain strategies lead to goal achievement.
For Profit Colleges and Universities 3 Analysis of for-profit colleges and universities, reviewing their history, business strategies, and management practices; setting them in the context of marketplace conditions, the framework of public policy and government regulations; and viewing them in the light of the public good. Variously explore FPCU’s governance, how they develop courses and programs, and the way they define faculty work; present findings from in-depth interviews with part-time and full-time faculty to understand how external forces and the imperative of profit generation affect faculty roles and responsibilities of faculty; analyze policy considerations that affect FPCUs, including federal regulation and oversight, accountability and assessment, and the legal and regulatory issues FPCUs face internationally; and finally address the notion of academic freedom and the distribution of public monies to FPCUs.
Budget and Financial Management in Higher Education 3 This course examines financial management and budgeting practices internal to institutions of higher education. The course provides Learners with a working knowledge of budget development, financial management, and fiduciary control in colleges and universities
Organization and Governance in Higher Education 3 Because of the complex nature of the postsecondary institution, this course creates eight subject area lenses. Each lens allows the reader to engage the specific paradigms and phenomena related to that aspect of higher education. The areas are arranged in the following order: classic organization theory, traditional administrative and governance models, campus climate and culture, leadership analysis, management principles, institutional change and assessment, perspectives on race and gender, and critical approaches to organizational governance.
Transnational Higher Education 3 Coves the extent and form of offshore activity, the pedagogical and cultural controversies that have plagued transnational education, the challenges it presents to governments, educators and HE managers, how governments are developing forms of regulation to integrate cross-border programs and branch-campuses into their strategic planning for the sector, the new opportunities for students and institutions.
Academic Leadership for Higher Education 3 Provides a compassionate understanding of the stresses of leadership in higher education and offers insights to those who do not fully appreciate why higher education is so hard to 'manage' and validation for those entirely familiar with this world.
Foundations of Distance Education 3 Covers the various technologies that can be used for the delivery of distance education and provides the basics needed to become a knowledgeable distance educator or manager of distance education systems including the theory and research that inform distance learning, practical skills and knowledge needed to function immediately in a distance learning environment, and managerial and administrative issues that arise in distance learning environments.
Community College Leadership and Administration 3 Emphasis is placed on deconstructing outdated practices and constructing new approaches to how contemporary community college leadership is viewed, practiced, and envisioned to develop new models focused on facilitating leadership innovativeness.
General studies
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Concept Paper 2 Ethical issues in research are studied and the Learner evaluates the research plan developed in modules RSH8951-RSH8953 against accepted ethical principles and practices in the field. The material developed in the modules is integrated into a summarizing document called the Dissertation Research Proposal. The proposal is comprised of Chapter I (Introduction), Chapter II (Literature Review), and Chapter III (Methodology). The Learner develops the Dissertation Research Proposal under the supervision of the faculty mentor, with a focus on the conceptual and methodological clarity of the research plan for the Learner’s dissertation topic. Once acceptable to the Learner and the faculty mentor, the draft of the Research Proposal is reviewed by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee and the University’s Ethics Committee. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Comprehensive Examination 2 Assures that the Learner has mastered knowledge of his or her discipline, specialization, and can demonstrate applications of that knowledge before formal candidacy status is granted and research in support of the dissertation is initiated. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research l 2 Continuation of RSH8954-P. The draft of the Dissertation Research Proposal is finalized and approved by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee and the University’s Ethics Committee. All steps necessary to begin data collection, including any necessary pilot testing, are completed. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research ll 2 Dissertation data are collected and analyzed. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research lll 2 the dissertation process is completed. The manuscript is prepared, accepted by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee, and the oral defense is conducted. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment. Candidates must have satisfied all financial obligations to the University and be enrolled at the time the oral defense is conducted. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.