BE Civil Engineering, Surveying & Topology

Civil engineering – surveying and topology is among the leading fields of civil engineering apart from being one of the most oldest yet sought after fields in engineering itself. Surveying & topology deals with the application of the civil engineering concepts and technology to build and design construction materials.

Furthermore, Civil Engineering - Surveying and Topology is a single field of study compared to other engineering discipline. Students during the program will be working on research projects and papers. In addition, students will also learn the old and new principles related to the field of Civil Engineering - Surveying and Topology.

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

The courses offered by Queensville University take into account about the latest development in the field.

  • You will work on research based project.
  • You will able to apply engineering principles within and outside the classroom
  • Develop skill set relevant to employers need
  • Students are able to take leadership roles and move up the career ladder more quickly
General studies
subjects
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course
description
Information Research Methods 1 By providing an introduction to the scholarly research process, with an emphasis on using both print and electronic information resources and services, this course is designed to help Learners develop information literacy—the ability to locate, evaluate, and use information to become independent, life-long Learners.
College Algebra 3 This course is a general purpose algebra course. It is a skill oriented course with an emphasis on the development of these skills through the use of real data. A basic understanding of high school algebra is necessary. 
Modern American History 3 This course is a study of the development of American characteristics and nationality from colonial beginnings through the period of Reconstruction, emphasizing the factors and forces which produced the Revolution, the Constitution, westward expansion, sectionalism and the Civil War. It also includes a study of the social, economic, and political forces that moved the United States through changing times from the post-Reconstruction era to the present, focusing on both domestic and foreign affairs in the country’s last century of development.
World's Religions 3 Provides an introduction to the historical, geographic, mythical, ritual, psychosocial, anthropological, and doctrinal differences among the major world religions.
English Composition I 3 The purpose of this course is to guide the learner through the writing process to develop expository prose with an emphasis on effective organization and on correctness. Utilizes exercises in developing, drafting, revising, proofreading in APA writing style for attaining collegiate writing skills.
English Composition II 3 This course focuses on applied writing using references, citations, and a bibliography. This course requires the completion of an 8-10 page research paper.
Introduction to Meteorology 3 An introductory course about the atmosphere environment, intended to relate one's everyday experiences to meteorological concepts and to stress the understanding and application of principles. It explains the ‘how’ and ‘why’ behind the nightly weather reports.
Controversial Environmental Issues 3 This course presents major environmental issues facing today’s world, such as: political issues; the effect of technology; waste disposal and the future of the environment. Advocates for each side of the issues present their views. The Learner is expected to analyze both sides of the controversy as well as present his/her critical opinions.
Health and Nutrition 3 Focuses on the personal responsibility of health for a lifetime of physical, psychological, emotional and social well-being
U.S. Government 3 This course is an elitist introduction to American government. Elite theory is contrasted to democratic theory and to modern pluralist political theory and includes examining the U.S. Constitution, American political history, power structures, public opinion, mass media, elections, parties, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, the courts, federalism, protest movements, and public policy.
Sociology 3 Looks into the principles and problems of group behavior, socialization, culture, and social organizations.
Psychology of Business 3 This course teaches Learners how to apply established psychological concepts to improve personal effectiveness in business situations. It demonstrates practical application of these concepts through case studies of problem situations commonly occurring in the workplace.
Introduction to Statistics 3 This is a first course in basic statistics. The design of the course is to expose the student to both descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how statistics can be used to be a better informed citizen in today’s world. 
Logic and Critical Thinking 3 This course helps learners to think more clearly, critically, and competently as well as sharpen reasoning abilities when encountering new and unexpected situations. Besides the development of higher order thinking, Learners will learn to formulate, analyze, and model problems, select relevant information in order to devise plans and test solutions. This includes an introduction to the principles of correct reasoning and their application. Emphasis is on improving the skills of thinking and reading critically, analyzing and evaluating arguments objectively, and constructing sound arguments based on relevant evidence.
General studies
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description
Architecture Principles 3 Focus on the role of architecture principles and provides both a theoretical and a practical perspective on architecture principles. The theoretical perspective involves a brief survey of the general concept of principle as well as an analysis of different flavors of principles. Architecture principles are regarded as a specific class of normative principles that direct the design of an enterprise, from the definition of its business to its supporting IT. The practical perspective on architecture principles is concerned with an approach to the formulation of architecture principles, as well as their actual use in organizations.
Introduction to Building Information Modeling 3 Provides an in-depth understanding of BIM technologies, the business and organizational issues associated with its implementation and the profound advantages that can be provided effectively through usage of BIM to all members of a project team. 
Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics 3 Covers energy and the first Law of thermodynamics, evaluating properties, control volume analysis using energy, the second law of thermodynamics, using entropy, analysis, vapor power systems, gas power systems, refrigeration and heat pump systems, thermodynamic relations, ideal gas mixtures and, reacting mixtures and combustion and chemical and phase equilibrium.
Fundamentals of Structural Analysis 3 Introduces engineering and architectural learners to the basic techniques for analyzing the most common structural elements, including beams, trusses, frames, cables, and arches. The subject covers the classical methods of analysis
Structural Concrete Design 3 Complete guidance to the analysis and design of reinforced and pre-stressed concrete structures and coverage the latest  code rules, emphasizing the code's strength approach and strain limits. Additional codes, standards, and specifications, as well as material properties and specific loads and safety provisions are also examined in detail. Includes full coverage of the application of shear design to beams with variable length in actual structure, the design of deep beams
Soil Mechanics and Foundations 3 Covers introduction to soil mechanics and foundations, geological characteristics of soils and particle sizes of soils, soils investigation, physical soil parameters and soil classification, soil compaction, one-dimensional flow of water through soils, stresses, strains, and elastic deformations of soils, stress path, one-dimensional consolidation settlement of fine-grained soils, shear strength of soils, a critical state model to interpret soil behavior, bearing capacity of soils and settlement of shallow foundations, pile foundations, two-dimensional flow of water through soils, stability of earth retaining structures and slope stability.
Construction Equipment and Methods 3 Establishes a full ability to understand and solve problems, communicate solutions, and manage their implementation. This subject helps build these skills through: a holistic view of construction technology, safe use to maximize productivity and how the principles of science are being applied; linking the material in this course to previously obtained knowledge such as statics, geotechnical engineering; and pedagogy designed to promote knowledge, and skill acquisition, such as case studies and open-ended problems.
Before Building: Site Planning in the Digital Age 3 It covers every topic required in site planning, including land use controls and the history behind the law. It also presents detailed coverage of the role of computer technologies in supporting site planning, including up-to-date hardware, software, and applications.
Engineering Ethics and Professional Practice 3 Bridging the gap between theory and practice, helps students quickly understand the importance of their conduct as a professional and how their actions can affect the health, safety, and welfare of the public and provides dozens of diverse engineering cases and a proven and structured method for analyzing them; practical application of the Engineering Code of Ethics; focus on critical moral reasoning as well as effective organizational communication; and in-depth treatment of issues such as sustainability, acceptable risk, whistle-blowing, and globalized standards for engineering.
General studies
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description
Civil Engineering 3 An introduction to the civil engineering profession with emphasis on careers open to the civil engineering students. Topics include: scope, specialties, education, professional practice, life-long learning, contemporary issues, ethics and societal impacts related to civil engineering.
Civil Engineering Materials 3 Covers properties and behavior of typical civil engineering materials, including wood, metals, aggregates, asphalt cement concrete, portland cement concrete, and composites. Laboratory exercises demonstrate selected engineering mechanics principles, including elastic, inelastic, and time-dependent material behavior. Additional topics include testing techniques, materials standards, report writing, and presentation of experimental data.
Structural Analysis 3 Introduction to structural concepts and techniques for analyzing trusses, determinate and indeterminate beams, and frame structures. Apply concepts from statics and mechanics of materials to determine internal forces and deflections of structural members and systems, including loads and load paths.
Transportation Engineering 3 Introduction to transportation in the United States, highway types and systems, principles of route location, vehicle characteristics, highway geometrics and design standards, drainage, environmental considerations, pavement design, and economic principles and engineering criteria for highway improvements.
Water Resources Planning and Management 3 Economic and environmental aspects of water use. Topics include flood damage reduction, water demand and hydrologic forecasting, water supply planning, and water resource systems operation.
Bituminous Materials 3 Applications and properties of asphalt binder, aggregates for bituminous mixtures, and analysis and design of asphalt concrete mixtures. Includes asphalt cement production, rheology, chemistry, and grading, aggregate grading and blending, and mixture design and characterization. Also discusses asphalt mixture production, construction, and recycling.
Matrix Structural Analysis 3 Analysis of trusses and frames by the direct stiffness method. Use of a typical commercial computer code is stressed as a tool for complex structures. Introduces three-dimensional structures.
Structural Concrete Design 3 Covers analysis and design of reinforced and pre-stressed concrete structures and brings all material up to date while maintaining practical, logical, easy-to-follow approach. Covers the latest code rules, emphasizing the code's strength approach and strain limits with additional codes, standards, and specifications, as well as material properties.
Structural Timber Design 3 Provides detailed information and in-depth guidance on the design of timber structures based on the common rules and rules for buildings and provides a step-by-step approach to the design of all of the most commonly used timber elements and connections using solid timber, glued laminated timber or wood based structural products.
General studies
subjects
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description
Topological Quantum Field Theory And Four Manifolds 3 Emphasis on the topological aspects of fermions manifested through chiral anomaly which is responsible for the generation of mass. This has its relevance in electroweak theory where it is observed that weak interaction gauge bosons attain mass topologically. These geometrical and topological features help to consider massive fermions for a composite state we can realize the internal symmetry of hadrons from reflection group.
Foundation Design: Theory and Practice 3 Covers principles of testing, interpretation, analysis, soil-structure interaction modeling, construction guidelines and applications to rational design, presents a wide array of numerical methods used in analyses so that learners can employ and adapt them on their own and emphasis on practical application, trains learners in actual design procedures using the latest codes and standards in use throughout the world.
Structural Concrete Design 3 Design of concrete slabs, deep beams, walls, and other plane structures; introduction to design of prestressed concrete structures.
Cartography 3 Introduction to the infrastructure systems that support urban socioeconomic activities, and (b) fundamental system design and analysis methods. Coverage of water resources, vertical, transportation, communications and energy infrastructure.
Mathematical Foundation of Geodesy 3 Covers Linear Equations.- The Adjustment Procedure in Tensor Form.- The Theory of Rounding Errors in the Adjustment by Elements.- A Contribution to the Mathematical Foundation of Physical Geodesy.- A Remark on Approximation of T by Series in Spherical Harmonics.- On the Geometry of Adjustment.- Remarks to the Discussion Yesterday.- Letters on Molodenskiy’s Problem.- On the Spectrum of Geodetic Networks.- Mathematical Geodesy.- Foundation of a Theory of Elasticity for Geodetic Networks.
Special Geodesy 3 Covers the entire field of geodesy and is intended to serve as an introductory course in the fields of geodesy, geophysics, surveying engineering, and geometrics. It provides a systematic overview of fundamental theory in physical geodesy, reference systems, and space and terrestrial measurement methods, together with the respective modeling techniques.
Informatics in Geometrical Geodesy 3 Methods of structural analysis. Trusses, arches, cables, frames; influence lines; deflections; force method; displacement method; computer applications. And Design criteria for varied structural applications, including buildings and bridges; design of elements using steel, concrete, masonry, wood, and other materials.
GIS and Cartographic Modeling 3 An introduction to the concepts, conventions, and capabilities of map algebra as a general language, this book describes the analytical use of raster-based GIS. By focusing on the fundamentals of cartographic modeling techniques, illustrates concepts that can be applied to any GIS.
Map Projection and Geodesy 3 Economic and environmental aspects of water use. Topics include flood damage reduction, water demand and hydrologic forecasting, water supply planning, and water resource systems operation.
Urban and Roads 3 A quantitative introduction to hydrologic and hydraulic systems, with a focus on integrated modeling and analysis of the water cycle and associated mass transport for water resources and environmental engineering. 
Remote Sensing 3 Bridge design history, methods of analysis, loads: static, live, dynamic. Design: allowable stress, ultimate strength, load resistance factor, supply/demand. Steel and concrete superstructures: suspension, cable stayed, prestressed, arches. Management of the assets, life-cycle cost, expected useful life, inspection, maintenence, repair, reconstruction. Bridge inventories, condition assessments, data acquisition and analysis, forecasts. Selected case histories and field visits.
Managing Engineering and Construction Processes 3 Introduction to the principles, methods and tools necessary to manage design and construction processes. Elements of planning, estimating, scheduling, bidding and contractual relationships. Valuation of project cash flows. Critical path method. Survey of construction procedures. Cost control and effectiveness. Field supervision.
General studies
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units
course
description
Graduation Project 3 Independent project assignment that requires student to apply the gained knowledge and training