PhD Architectural Engineering - Structure

The PhD program in Architectural Engineering - structure is an extensive offering by Queensville University which helps in the development of the engineering concepts in the best of ways. To further enhance the candidates' learning, the university has included the research projects which allows for in-depth learning opportunities.

The architectural engineering principles in terms of structure fall under a complex field of study which calls for the candidates to be aware of the foundations and thus most of the candidates enrolling for this PhD program in Queensville University are professionals in the field of architectural engineering - structure.

 

What will you learn from this course

Through this PhD program you will be able to do the following

  • You will work on research based project.
  • You will able to apply engineering principles within and outside the classroom
  • Develop skill set relevant to employers need
  • Students are able to take leadership roles and move up the career ladder more quickly
General studies
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Information Research Strategies 2 Introduction to information research including electronic resources. This course is designed to help researchers locate, evaluate, and use information. It includes exploration of the research process, search strategies, locating resources, source documentation, and organization of research.
General studies
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Statistical Modeling and Analysis for Complex Data Problems 2 reviews some of today’s more complex problems, and reflects some of the important research directions in the field. work in areas of theoretical statistics, applied statistics, probability theory, and shastic processes – present survey chapters on various theoretical and applied problems of importance and interest to researchers and students across a number of academic domains.
Optimal Experimental Design 2 Introduces the philosophy of experimental design, provides an easy process for constructing experimental designs, calculating necessary sample size using R programs and teaches by example using a custom made program package
Mathematical Modeling 2 complete range of basic modeling techniques: it provides a consistent transition from simple algebraic analysis methods to simulation methods used for research. Such an overview of the spectrum of modeling techniques is very helpful for the understanding of how a research problem considered can be appropriately addressed.
Research Methods and Design 2 Learners gain a thorough understanding of statistical tests appropriate to their dissertation topic and design, how to interpret the results of the tests and how to conduct follow-up analyses, as appropriate. This course includes guidelines and "best practices" for collecting data. Power analysis, what it is, why do it, and how to use available software is covered. Data preparation, use of software to analyze data, and understanding the calculated results are covered. Experience with computer-based statistical analysis techniques is stressed. Emphasizes what is applicable to the Learner’s proposed research questions, design, construct/variable definitions and properties of measurements. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Dissertation Planning, Writing, and Defending 2 step-by-step through the dissertation process, with checklists, illustrations, sample forms, and updated coverage of ethics, technology, and the literature review.
General studies
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Pavement Management Systems 2 Principles of pavement management, including inventory, condition assessment, needs determination, and budget analysis. Emphasis on field condition assessment techniques. Presents database design to illustrate data handling techniques and introduces several software packages.
Decision-Making in Complex Dynamic Systems 2 Introduces students to the theory and application of modeling techniques and simulations in the analysis of decision alternatives in complex engineering problems. Topics include queuing theory, system dynamics modeling, agent-based modeling, discrete event simulations, etc. Students will be required to conceptualize and implement an appropriate research/engineering problem of choice (this could be a dissertation/thesis problem).
Introduction to System identification 2 Introductory course in system identification theory, emphasis on fitting classical and modern control-theory models to collected data using least squares and ERA. Preliminary topics include sampling theory and frequency domain math.
Stability of Earth Structures 2 Investigates the stability of both natural and anthropogenic derived structures. Studies include the application of engineering geology to slope issues, slope stability analysis procedures, computational methods. Also covers the design and analysis of soil nail walls.
Engineering with Developing Communities 2 Study of applying appropriate, community-based, and sustainable engineering in developing communities. Concepts of human-centered design and sustainable development are covered. Topics are drawn from several areas of engineering, including water and wastewater treatment, construction materials, solid waste, energy, and information systems.
General studies
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Statics and Strength of Materials for Construction 3 An accessible and visually oriented introduction to structural theory, with illustrations and examples of building frameworks and components to enable students to visually connect theoretical concepts with the experiential nature of real buildings and materials.
Masonry Structural Design 3 Covers basic structural behavior and design of low-rise, bearing wall buildings, materials used in masonry construction, code basis for structural design of masonry buildings, including seismic design, introduction of MSJC treatment of structural design, strength design of reinforced and unreinforced masonry elements, allowable-stress design of reinforced and unreinforced masonry elements, comparison of design by the allowable-stress approach versus the strength approach, lateral load analysis of shear wall structure, design and detailing of floor and roof diaphragms
Structural Analysis with the Finite Element Method 3 Presents the basis of the FEM for structural analysis and a detailed description of the finite element formulation for axially loaded bars, plane elasticity problems, symmetric solids and general three dimensional solids, describes the background theory for each structural model considered, details of the finite element formulation and guidelines for the application to structural engineering problems.
Beam Structures: Classical and Advanced Theories 3 Unified approach to beam theory that includes practically all classical and advanced models for beams and which has become established and recognized globally as the most important contribution to the field in the last quarter of a century.
Earthquake Hazard and Seismic Risk Reduction 3 Provides an overview of the achievements and experiences of different countries in disaster reduction that covers Disaster Reduction, Earthquake Hazards, and Earthquake Engineering.
Advanced Reinforced Concrete Structures 3 Discusses reinforced concrete members and provides techniques for sizing the cross section, calculating the required amount of reinforcement, and detailing the reinforcement. Design procedures and flowcharts guide you through code requirements, and worked-out examples demonstrate the proper application of the design provisions. Includes Mechanics of reinforced concrete, Material properties of concrete and reinforcing steel, Considerations for analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures, Requirements for strength and serviceability, Principles of the strength design method, Design and detailing requirements for beams, one-way slabs, two-way slabs, columns, walls, and foundations
Advanced Steel and Composite Structures 3 Covers a range of special topics, including performance-based design and human tolerance for the wind-induced dynamic motions of tall buildings and presents preliminary analysis techniques, graphical approaches for determining wind and seismic loads, and graphical aids for estimating unit-quantity of structural steel. The final chapter deals with the art of connection design.
Analysis of Plates and Shells 3 Covers Introduction to structural analysis by the finite element method, finite elements for axially loaded rods, advanced 1D rod elements and requirements for the numerical solution, 2D solids, Linear triangular and rectangular elements, 2D solids, higher order elements, shape functions and isoparametric formulation, ax-symmetric solids, three dimensional solids, bending of slender beam, thick/slender beams, Timoshenko theory, thin plates. Kirchhoff’s theory, thick/thin plates, analysis of shells using flat elements, analysis of arbitrary shape shells using degenerate solid elements, three-dimensional rods and shell stiffness, prismatic structures, miscellaneous: inclined supports, displacements, constrains, nodal condensation error estimation, pre and post-processing and Mesh generation and visualization of computer results.
Plastic-Hinge Methods For Framed Structures 3 Provides a rather complete procedure of the automatic plastic-hinge analysis: The one/two/three-linear behaviors of the material are considered Both fixed and repeated loading are authorized. The P-delta effects are also taken into account. The beam-to-column joints could be rigid or semi-rigid. The compact or slender cross-sections are examined. The analysis is carried out using alternatively direct or step-by-step methods. Both analysis and optimization aspects are envisaged in such a way that re-analyze of optimal structure is possible for eventual verification.
Earthquake Resistant Buildings 3 Provides a general introduction to the design of buildings which must be resistant to the effect of earthquakes, preventive building structure, examines building structures and vertical components, and examines analyses the disastrous influence of vertical components.
General studies
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description
Concept Paper 2 Ethical issues in research are studied and the Learner evaluates the research plan developed in modules RSH8951-RSH8953 against accepted ethical principles and practices in the field. The material developed in the modules is integrated into a summarizing document called the Dissertation Research Proposal. The proposal is comprised of Chapter I (Introduction), Chapter II (Literature Review), and Chapter III (Methodology). The Learner develops the Dissertation Research Proposal under the supervision of the faculty mentor, with a focus on the conceptual and methodological clarity of the research plan for the Learner’s dissertation topic. Once acceptable to the Learner and the faculty mentor, the draft of the Research Proposal is reviewed by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee and the University’s Ethics Committee. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Comprehensive Examination 2 Assures that the Learner has mastered knowledge of his or her discipline, specialization, and can demonstrate applications of that knowledge before formal candidacy status is granted and research in support of the dissertation is initiated. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research l 2 Continuation of RSH8954-P. The draft of the Dissertation Research Proposal is finalized and approved by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee and the University’s Ethics Committee. All steps necessary to begin data collection, including any necessary pilot testing, are completed. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research ll 2 Dissertation data are collected and analyzed. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only.
Doctoral Dissertation Research lll 2 the dissertation process is completed. The manuscript is prepared, accepted by the Learner’s Dissertation Committee, and the oral defense is conducted. Candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment.